Schlitz Beer and Sun Are Good For You

Monday, September 10, 2012

Can you imagine the modern FDA and its reaction to this ad for Schlitz beer in 1936?

As the summer sun head south; as days grow shorter and stormier – we get less and less of sunshine’s benefits. Likewise, our ordinary foods are lacking in Sunshine Vitamin D, so essential to robust vitality.

Schlitz breweries would be stormed by government agents in black armor and jack boots, drawing guns and looking for the ‘illegally bottled’ Vitamin D.

Did Schlitz bottle sunshine in its beer? Of course, even with added Vitamin D, there couldn’t possibly be enough Vitamin D in an entire 12-pack to make a difference (same goes for milk, which provides a very small portion of necessary Vitamin D). However, the ad is fun and inspiring, and at least it promotes healthy sunshine as opposed to hiding from the sun unless one wears a boatload of chemical SPF protection that blocks the sun’s healthy rays. Schlitz was attempting to capitalize on the health craze of the 1930s.

Here is the medical establishment-government-nanny complex’s modern answer to Schlitz.

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4 Responses to Schlitz Beer and Sun Are Good For You

  1. Rich says:

    September 10th, 2012 at 11:11 pm

    The feminists would be frothing at the mouth, also. Notice the look on the guys face chasing the woman in the bathing suit! Pure male domination!

  2. Amy Alkon says:

    September 11th, 2012 at 10:01 am

    Best of all, even with the nanny state getting its grubby fingers into everything, that Neutrogena sunblock was pretty worthless for many years, as it was “photo-unstable,” meaning…it broke down when light hit it! 

    The most protective sunblock, for those of us who choose to wear it, is Anthelios from France — which the government didn’t allow to be sold here for many years. Why? Because people in Europe who’d used it were dropping dead like flies? No. Just because. That’s all the reason they need.

    PS And I know natural sunlight is best for vitamin D production (I take 5,000 iu of D daily because I’m vain and don’t want to look like an Hermes handbag when I’m 60).

  3. DavidBrennan says:

    September 12th, 2012 at 12:31 am

    Rich:

    I’m not sure that there’s a single woman EXCEPT for those employed by the government, academia, and the mainstream media who would be offended by that. So unless you’re surrounded by women in those areas, I think it’s pointless to get all worried about what “feminists think”. (Incidentally, here’s a fascinating three-part article about the true history of feminism: http://truthtellers.org/alerts/FemiCommunismPt1.html. It’s neither Christian nor American in its true origins.)

    Amy:

    I’ve heard (I believe via Robb Wolf, but I’m not sure) that if you are getting a lot of saturated fat and eat relatively low carb (certainly avoiding grains) that the danger of sun in terms of both skin cancer and aesthetic damage to the skin are negated. Rather than getting wrinkly, the sun will do the opposite: make your skin vibrant and a robust tan color. (Michael Eades writes a bit about that here: http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/supplements/sunshine-superman/)

    I come from western and northern European stock, and my family has EXTREMELY sensitive skin, with (always treatable) skin cancer common. All my life, the sun just burned me or made my skin peel. But this past summer, my first while eating healthy (mostly), I had absolutely zero problems, and I tried to get at least a couple of hours of strong, direct sunlight each week. (Also note that Vitamin D triggered by the sun reportedly stays in the body much longer than exogenous Vitamin D.)

    So you might want to look into whether the sun will actually make you look like a “handbag” if you’re eating healthy.

  4. Weekend Link Love - Edition 207 | Mark's Daily Apple says:

    July 25th, 2013 at 4:41 pm

    [...] try the long-discontinued Schlitz beer with “Sunshine Vitamin D”? I imagine the elites in the upper echelons of the Vitamin D Council have hoarded cases of the [...]

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