Red & Green

Van Jones, Obama’s “Green Czar,” finally got booted from the White House. It’s hilarious to see that the Wall Street Journal reported it as such:

Van Jones, an administration official specializing in environmentally friendly “green jobs,” has been linked to efforts suggesting a government role in the Sept. 11 terror attacks and to derogatory comments about Republicans.

The Journal has, of course, censored the real reasons why Van Jones is gone. No one remembers a 9-11 truther moment from 5 years ago, or cares, and the part about “derogatory comments about Republicans” is a bit anemic, if not laughable. Van Jones was contributing immensely to King Obama’s declining Messiah worship, and so it’s time to clean up Obama’s Dream Team, and get rid of the most radical denizens who are doing his popularity great harm. Van Jones was ultra-controversial not because of Glenn Beck’s show, and not because of FOX news bobbing heads that relentlessly pounded on his tendentious past. Van Jones was compelled to depart because he is not representative of mainstream American.

Van Jones, in obtaining his White House post, received a payoff for his years of tireless efforts in the name of Communism, militant greenism, redistributionism, and yes, anti-white-ism. He came from a radical power structure that was bent on obtaining positions of political power in order to direct payoffs—power, wealth, jobs—to long-time, fanatical associates, and undertake a major campaign to redistribute wealth from the middle class to the minority poor. He was a supporter of the Jena Six—a gang of black boys who engaged in a brutal beating of a white schoolmate—and he co-founded Color of Change, a radical organization dedicated to political empowerment of specific classes of people.

Jones was not a scientist who was dedicated to cleaning up the environment. He, like all people who aspire to high-level political radicalism, had a law degree so that he could move up the ladder of political opportunity. It just so happens that using the cornerstone of environmentalism—a cause embraced and loved by a majority of Americans—was his single greatest launch pad into the political mainstream, which was necessary to give his radical, Communist agenda some political traction. In using the “green” cause to gain attention and influence, he moved quickly through the power ranks, won the adoration of the media, and got noticed for his good deeds by the Left establishment. Look at all of the bullshit “awards” he won, just last year, as he was being placed into position for a mainstream, political appointment. He won a “Paul Wellstone” award, a “creative citizenship” award, and an “eco-entrepreneur” award from Howard University. And his career was kick started twelve years ago by the Rockefeller Foundation—what a surprise! Apparently, in the world of feel-good “awards,” this qualifies as entrepreneurship:

Last year, Jones led a coalition of business, labor, and environmental groups that persuaded the Oakland City Council to provide $250,000 in seed money for America’s first green-collar-jobs corps. He helped draft the Pathways out of Poverty legislation which pledged $125 million to train 35,000 people a year in green-collar jobs. And in February, Jones launched Green for All, an organization whose goal is to procure $1 billion in federal funding by 2012 for green-collar programs. “We are going to have to weatherize millions of homes and install millions of solar panels. That’s millions of new jobs. We need to connect the people who most need the work with the work that most needs to be done,” he says. [Emphasis added]

 Do you see the pattern? He uses government money to redistribute the wealth to certain classes and favored causes under the guise of “necessity” due to impending environmental doom. These coercive machinations transpire well beyond Van Jones and his cabal of “creative citizens,” which is one reason why the environmental movement is so evil and anti-liberty. They use environmentalism and heartwarming green stories to make major power grabs and redistribute wealth in the name of saving the planet. After all, who can possibly oppose righteous programs dedicated to “saving the planet”?

Jones says, “We speak for the least empowered folks, the people who didn’t finish high school, the people with criminal convictions, the victims of Hurricane Katrina.” I suppose throwing the “Katrina victims” into that mix earned some more “awards.” The article also says, “Jones has a newfangled rap, but behind the exterior, he is an old-style activist—a political animal who is looking to government to fund his revolution.” [Emphasis added]

Americans, even the suburban androids that willingly recite the received opinion on green religion taught in the public schools, are not ready for a radical, avowed Communist and fanatical redistributionist. Americans are not willing to “fund his revolution,” because his revolution is against people who are successful, educated, middle class, paid legitimately for their work, and who are not among a minority class. Americans, generally speaking, have had it with the constant victimology and flaming up of race wars, and they just want to live in peace.

Lastly, this paragraph from the story in Fast Company is an indication of this man’s vulgar ego.

In Jones’s office, alongside all the speaking invitations are Superman logos and action figures—dozens of them. They’re in his car, too, and all around his house. Sometimes he feels like Clark Kent, he says, and needs to strap on a cape to get the job done. To an outside observer, the big S’s might also indicate supersize hubris. But then, maybe that’s what he needs.

Sayonara Superman. And take your cape and your dolls with you.

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