Making Orwell Proud

Saturday, May 22, 2010
Posted in category Surveillance State

Here’s a good blog on the evils of E-Z Pass, the creepy kind of stuff they have out east. Illinois also has this, or something similar, which is why I hate the drive from Detroit to Minneapolis, going around Chicago. Invictus says,

I’ve used the E-Z Pass system since its inception, and cannot envision myself sitting on line to pay a toll ever again.  In that regard, it is a godsend.

I have, however, often wondered when law enforcement might begin to use the E-Z Pass system to target speeders.  Say, for example you enter an E-Z Pass enabled highway at Point X and exit the highway at Point Y.  The distance between Point X and Point Y is 80 miles, but you traveled that distance in only an hour.  Could be a problem, as the E-Z Pass system knows when and where you entered and when and where you exited.  This seems to me like a no-brainer for law enforcement — and it’s indisputable (absent mechanical error) that you averaged 80 MPH.

Then he points to a FAQ on the website of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety that reads:

Are there other technologies that could aid in enforcing speed limits in both urban and suburban areas?


Two emerging technologies are being used to enforce speed limits. Intelligent speed adaptation links a position of the traveling vehicle via Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and computerized maps with speed limits to determine if the vehicle is speeding. The system may work as an advisory system for the driver or an intervention system that automatically reduces the vehicle’s speed to comply with the speed limit. Point-to-point speed camera technology records the time it takes a vehicle to travel between two camera locations to compute an average speed and compare it to the posted speed limit. This system uses optical recognition technology to match the two photographed vehicle license plates. Point-to-point speed cameras are being used to enforce the speed limit on the Hume Freeway in Victoria, Australia. In the UK, point-to-point speed camera systems are known as “Distributed Average Speed” camera systems and have received government approval.

Indeed, convenience is the key. The intentions of our Orwellian Masters is to make life and travel inconvenient so that you are willing – no, begging – to pay for the “convenience” factor offered by the omnipotent snoop state. This “convenience” of bypassing the waiting game that is holding up the rest of the masses is a crucial tool in tracking everyone’s whereabouts while also extorting payment from individuals for the rent seekers. Thanks to Mikey for the link.

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4 Responses to Making Orwell Proud

  1. Michael says:

    May 24th, 2010 at 9:11 am

    I try to avoid any toll roads in general. However, when I use them, I make sure that I don’t deviate from the speed limit for this very reason. According to the Massachusetts Turnpike Authority, or whatever they’re called now, I guess it’s the Mass DOT, they *could* release the information. One of the reasons for me enrolling is because of the long lines at the cash tolls. I wonder if this is actually a calculated decision on behalf o the state to gin up enrollments. Probably, I guess.

    “9. NON-DISCLOSURE
    a) In accordance with the provisions of G.L. c. 81A, Section 10 (a) and (b), MassDOT and the FAST LANE Service
    Center shall hold all customer account information confidential, except as otherwise authorized for MassDOT administrative and legal proceedings.”

    http://www.massdot.state.ma.us/Highway/downloads/fastlane/fastlane_indvapp.pdf

    Caveat emptor.

    The best thing to do is to simply avoid toll roads if you can for this very reason.

  2. salvage says:

    May 24th, 2010 at 3:24 pm

    Isn’t less speeding a good thing?

  3. Iluvatar says:

    May 24th, 2010 at 9:56 pm

    @ salvage:

    Almost never! Especially if you want to decrease your travel time. The issue has ALWAYS been and ALWAYS will be the safe conduit of your vehicle on the road. And sometimes speed differentials of more than 15mph ARE dangerous.

    Don’t understand why the ovines/bovines/lemmings don’t get this?

    C’mon, man! People, think!!!

    Ain’t that hard to do!

    The only ~credible reason for cutting your speed down is to conserve gasoline; which is not a bad reason (duh!).

    But if you are doing that when the average speed is 10-20 mph greater than you are – then you become a TARGET for a traffic accident! (you had better HUG that right lane w/ your life!)

    Just recently was driving 65-70 in a 55 w/ a state trooper behind me. All other traffic was doing the same. Statie just passed me and went on his business! Know why? Our relative speeds were just about zilch!

    Food for thought dude…

    It is about relative speeds – please process this – it is really a different thought…

  4. Michael says:

    June 1st, 2010 at 9:10 am

    @Salvage

    Most “speeders” are actually pretty safe drivers. And almost all motorists “speed” at some point.

    It’s another non-crime that the state uses to fluff up its “revenue” stream.

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