Detroit’s Prime Time

Sunday, February 13, 2011
Posted in category Detroit

Bailout aside, everyone knows this is one damn fine commercial. No Super Bowl spot received as many google hits as this commercial except the Star Spangled Banner flub by Christina Aguilera. My one beef: at 39 seconds into the video you see a doorman, and the building behind him is the Penobscot building. Only that gentleman is the doorman for the Guardian building – Detroit’s art deco showcase – just down the street. Come on, everyone knows that…


Here’s are some photos of the Guardian building.












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3 Responses to Detroit’s Prime Time

  1. Alex says:

    February 14th, 2011 at 10:05 am

    If it was a Ford commercial, I might have been convinced. As such, it’s Chrysler, so the real, unedited version would show Eminem saying, “And this is what we do”; then turns around and receives a bag full of cash from John Conyers and Timothy Geithner (lol).

  2. Jeannie Queenie says:

    February 15th, 2011 at 1:32 am

    Yes, that was a strong Chrysler ad, but wow, that dude Eminen is seriously depressed. After all the misogynist messages over the years, one wonders why the hell Chrysler chose him for the saleman of their cars! Seriously, doesn’t matter that Eminen sold over thirty million albums in this country alone, with all his psychic payload over women, drugs, even his own mother, it is really hard to believe he could be enjoying his money. Equally sad is that for all his hatred of women, he has taken it upon himself to adopt other’s girls…read about it here under the family heading….http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eminem#Family

    If you took those two photos Karen of the guardian and the Penobscot buildings, they are fantastic. I used to work in the FIsher building..(designed the original Kmart logo when S.S. Kresge was there)…isn’t it near that section of town as well?

  3. Arild says:

    March 14th, 2011 at 4:27 am

    Sorry, not with you on this one. I found it revolting and disturbing with its strong collectivist undertones and use of communist symbolism.

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